The Boiling Point

Boiling Point Policies

Policy on Anonymous Sources


To our readers,

The Boiling Point has long held a strict policy on when it is permissible to quote anonymous sources.

Anonymous sources are only used as a last resort, as without one’s name attached to a quote, a person may share views that are driven by a personal agenda or are not necessarily truthful.

Sometimes, however, the only way people will be willing to share information is if they can speak off the record. Otherwise, they may be held back by a fear of challenging authority figures or a commonly held opinion.

Thus, The Boiling Point uses anonymous sources only when all four of these conditions are met:

1. The quote is critical to the story and the story is critical to the newspaper.

2. Information provided by anonymous source cannot be attained in any other way.

3. Any facts presented by the interviewee have been verified by at least three other people.

4. Faculty adviser Mrs. Joelle Keene knows the identities of the anonymous source(s).

Policy on Conflict of Interest


Adopted May 2016

Recognizing that in a small school such as Shalhevet, some conflict of interest is unavoidable…

And recognizing that conflict of interest is endlessly variable and cannot always be predicted, so this policy is not comprehensive…

The Editorial Board nevertheless reiterates (numbers 1 – 5) or establishes (number 6) the following policies for The Boiling Point and shalhevetboilingpoint.com :

1.  The Chair of Agenda may not be Editor-in-Chief of the Boiling Point.

2.  BP staff may not interview their own parents or siblings.

3.  BP staff may not write a story about a co-curricular they are a part of (e.g., Model Congress, Choir, Drama, etc.)

4. No editor involved in a co-curricular activity should see, review or be involved with any story about that activity.

5.  BP staff should not interview their friends.  This is sometimes unavoidable but all efforts should be made to find other suitable sources of information.

6.  Regarding leadership positions on school committees, the Board hereby adopts the following gradual timetable, to be phased in over three years:

a.  The Editor-in-Chief of the Boiling Point may not also be Chair of Agenda. This is policy is long-standing and predates adoption of the current policy.

b.  In addition to the above, as of 2016-17 BP EIC cannot be Agenda officer, but can be Agenda Rep.

c.  As of 2017-18, all of the above, plus: BP EIC cannot be Agenda rep.

d.  As of 2017-18, all of the above, plus: no BP Editor of any section except Arts or Sports can be an Agenda officer.  (Can still be a rep.)

e.  As of 2018-19, all of the above, plus:  no BP Editor of any section except Arts or Sports can be an Agenda representative.

Policy on Courtesy Titles


To our readers,

The Boiling Point has long held a policy on titles given to people that we quote, attribute, and write about. Out of respect, we give every staff member a courtesy title such as “Dr.,” “Rabbi,” Mr.” “Ms.” or “Mrs.”  Since we refer to students by first name in our articles, it is important that adults are given the official title that they have day-to-day, just as students are called by their first names. 

It is especially important we do this at a Jewish high school, where Judaic faculty almost always automatically have a courtesy title because they are rabbis.

If we did not give courtesy titles to everyone, then articles would look like this: 

Rabbi David Stein and English teacher Michelle Crincoli gave a joint seminar last week on Jews in American literature.  Rabbi Stein described Bernard Malamud’s The Fixer, and Crincoli talked about Shylock in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice.  The class was moderated by Dean of Students Jason Feld.  Feld thanked Crincoli and Rabbi Stein for coming up with the idea and said he hoped that they would do more things like it.

As opposed to this, which gives both sides of the Shalhevet faculty a respectful title: 

Rabbi David Stein and English teacher Ms. Michelle Crincoli gave a joint seminar last week on Jews in American literature.  Rabbi Stein described Bernard Malamud’s The Fixer, and Ms. Crinkoli talked about Shylock in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice.  The class was moderated by Dean of Students Mr. Jason Feld.  Mr. Feld thanked Ms. Crincoli and Rabbi Stein for coming up with the idea and said he hoped that they would do more things like it.

To respect all faculty and staff equally, we write about people with the titles that they have.